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The Kingdoms of North America by ZekSora The Kingdoms of North America by ZekSora

(Note: This is from The Century, a world-building project of mine.)

The Great Convention of 1829-30 came at a very difficult time for the British Empire, but then again it was because the Empire was having difficulties that the Convention was necessary. After many disastrous events, one thing became plain for anyone to see: the Empire was massively, disgustingly, overstretched. 

The build up to the Great Convention began with the Cape Wars of 1802-1809, an total disaster for all parties involved. Despite the fact that neither of the rebelling factions actually managed to capture anything and were generally characterized by gross incompetence and panicked disorganization, it still took British forces seven years to regain control of the entire Cape, a worrying sign. 

The next major event worrying away at Parliament were the Western Revolts. The Revolts were not exactly wars, closer to a prolonged period of intense unrest in the less-settled west of the American colonies. The King had banned settlement beyond a certain line, but his proclamations were mostly ignored by American colonists hungry for all the land they could get. Unfortunately, this meant they had to set up effectively independent governments, which aren’t exactly taxable. Quite a few Royal Governors eventually got tired of tax revenues slipping out of their fingers, and began clamping down in the west, establishing their own authority and formalizing the governments there. Of course, there was the small problem that the colonists weren’t supposed to be there in the first place. Both the King and Parliament told the colonial governments in no uncertain terms to stop formalizing western settlement. The colonial governments acknowledged this and continued to do it anyway. The central British government was completely unable to do anything, with tensions in Europe holding its attention.

Then, of course, came the War, lasting for nearly eight years and leaving Britain in possession of all the former Dutch colonies across the globe, as well as several other spoils of war including effective control over most of the Indian subcontinent. Needless to say, this was a lot to handle for anyone. Thus, while at first glance, the British Empire seemed to be at its highest peak, it was in fact an overstretched house of cards ready to collapse at the slightest provocation.

Most everyone in positions of power in Britain saw this, and realized that if the Empire was to maintain its power, something would have to be done. Thus, the Convention was called to determine the future course of Britain all over the globe. What finally came out of it, after a drafting and ratification process taking over a year, was a complete restructuring of the British Empire.

The Empire would be divided into several categories of state:

  • The Colonies would be ruled in much the same way as before, with an increased role for Companies under Crown charter like the East India Company being the only significant change.
  • The Provinces would be given some measure of self-government; on the local level mayors and representatives would be elected, and Provincial Assemblies existed in an advisory capacity. However, the Royal Governor appointed by HM would have final say on most matters of importance. The various provinces would have their own militias, but any standing armies would be a part of the British military structure.
  • The Kingdoms would be effectively independent, ruled in Personal Union by HM, free to run their own domestic and some of their foreign policy. They were so independent they were allowed to write their own Charters or Constitutions, if they so pleased (and most of them did). On military matters, they were allowed to keep their own standing armies and navies, but they still had to co-operate on the broader strokes of foreign policy, and were a fully integrated part of the Empire’s economic sphere. 

Though the first Kingdom created would be that of the Cape, the vast majority of the Kingdoms would be in North America, hammered out of the former Colonies during the Great Convention. They were, of course, fully allowed to settle their western lands (if they had any) and determine their own form of government. Despite this, Pennsylvania was the only Kingdom that really adopted a radical system, having a unicameral parliament with no upper house and no voting requirements. Slavery is still prevalent in many of the southern Kingdoms, though the slave trade has long been abolished and the land is beginning to grow tired in many states. The current hope of HM’s Government is that it may die out on its own in the Kingdoms soon, but no one can be certain. 

(If you have any questions about the history and politics of the Kingdoms, the Imperial structure, or the foreign relations of the Kingdoms/Empire, please ask and I will be happy to give a detailed answer.)

Add a Comment:
 
:iconimprobablespace:
improbableSpace Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Is Canada not divided into states? Or whatever those political divisions are
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:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2016
Ah, no. Canada is much more centralist than the other Kingdoms and gives less influence/autonomy to its western regions, thanks to a lack of settlement in those regions when compared to the other Kingdoms.
Reply
:iconimprobablespace:
improbableSpace Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Makes sense. I guess it would be rather unnecessary dividing such a sparsely populated kingdom.
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2016
Well, the St. Lawrence valley is pretty well-populated--it's just the west that isn't very receptive to settlement.
Reply
:iconimprobablespace:
improbableSpace Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, you're right. I love the scenario, by the way!
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2016
Thanks! Glad you like it.
Reply
:iconsoaringaven:
SoaringAven Featured By Owner Edited May 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Never knew paradise was located in east-cost USA ^_^ Great job :D
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 17, 2016
Thank you! :)
Reply
:iconlumi-natis:
Lumi-Natis Featured By Owner May 16, 2016
Very interesting scenario! ^^
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 16, 2016
Thank you! :)
Reply
:icontoixstory:
ToixStory Featured By Owner May 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I hope you don't mind, I shared this excellent map on my Facebook page: www.facebook.com/ToixStory/?fr…;:)
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:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 15, 2016
Not at all! Thank you :)
Reply
:iconxanthoc:
Xanthoc Featured By Owner May 14, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Noting all the similarities in the Charters of Marlyand, Virginia, and Carolina, how are relations between all three nations?
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:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 14, 2016
Well, all of the Kingdoms are economically integrated; there are no trade barriers whatsoever between any of them, and they are all part of the greater British Empire. However, yes, Maryland, Virginia, Carolina, and Georgia share a common "Southern" identity, and a more stratified social structure than most of the other colonies.
Reply
:iconcdmonte:
cdmonte Featured By Owner May 14, 2016
Amazing job and fantastic historical scenario!!!
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 14, 2016
Why thank you! :)
Reply
:iconlatexiana:
LaTexiana Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  Student Digital Artist
I really like this. I've been hypothesizing on a similar timeline myself. Did South Carolina cede most of its western claims to Georgia?
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 14, 2016
Nope, most of their western claims were ceded to the newly created province of Tennessee after the creation of the Kingdom of Carolina.

And thank you. :)
Reply
:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Indeed I do! I fear you may have covered it (and if so I apologize), but in this world what happened to the Royal Proclamation of 1763? Are Aboriginals still allocated national spaces of their own?
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 13, 2016
I did cover it, under the Western Revolts, but I may not have been clear as to their final fate. The colonies were given complete control over their western lands to do with as they pleased when they became Kingdoms.
Reply
:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner May 14, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Oh, joy...no Pontiac or Tecumseh in this timeline, then?
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:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 14, 2016
Nope. They were butterflied away, sadly.
Reply
:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner May 15, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Pity...not even a Riel?
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 15, 2016
Well, it's early days yet. This map shows just after the Convention, around 1832.

(The western lands were already pretty settled before the Convention, just illegitimately.)
Reply
:iconavatarvyakara:
AvatarVyakara Featured By Owner May 17, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Ah. Fair enough, so.
Reply
:iconmoralisticcommunist:
MoralisticCommunist Featured By Owner May 13, 2016
What so what are the differences between the two types of upper houses? One is composed of nobles and the other is composed of government officials?And how do these states determine who gets what seat.
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:iconart5ec:
ART5EC Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I believe the way it works is that there is a House of Lords which consists of people granted a peerage (I'm not sure if they qualify as nobility in the traditional sense) and a House of Commons composed of elected officials like the US House of Representatives. I'm not entirely sure about the nuances of it though.
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner Edited May 13, 2016
I think he was asking about how the different types of upper houses--appointed and hereditary--functioned. All the Kingdoms have lower houses composed of elected officials and modeled off the House of Commons in Britain proper.
Reply
:iconart5ec:
ART5EC Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ah, I see. Well I'm afraid I can't help him with that.
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:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 13, 2016
In the hereditary upper houses, seats are held for life and passed to the holder's heir on their death. In the appointed upper houses, seats are still held for life, but become vacant upon the holder's death. The lower house then nominates several candidates to fill the empty seat, and HM's Representative in the Kingdom chooses from between them who will hold the seat.
Reply
:iconzalezsky:
zalezsky Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
amazing! i love it
Reply
:iconzeksora:
ZekSora Featured By Owner May 13, 2016
Thank you! :)
Reply
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